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February 27, 2012

Comments


I find it very troubling that Rick Santorum continues to misunderstand what the late President Kennedy and President Obama is conveying on religious freedom and educational issues. He demonstrates a poor understanding of historical American political issues during Kennedy's presidency. President Kennedy a Roman Catholic like Santorum , was dealing with Protestant distrust of him, hence "separation of church and State is absolute ". Obviously, he also did not read Obama's speech on education. Santorum lacks the skill to choose his words carefully.

I think that higher education should be available to anyone who wants it. I also think Vocational Education should be available to anyone who wants it. Unfortunately, what neither candidate seems to get is that there is still a cultural attitude about vocational education (even among Santorum supporters who criticize Obama's elitism) that makes it seem less worth or less intelligent. It is certainly a different kind of intelligence, but how many parents want their kids to make something nowadays? I think it is very problematic for our country. I am starting shop classes next weekend as an adult (which I never got in public school or with my mom working all the time as a kid), even though I went to graduate school and am a "knowledge worker." I think we need to be better about not segregating the two, as someone who can think but cannot do is pretty useless. I blog on education issues, and I've written about the critical importance of integrating "elective" courses like foreign language and vocational skills into the curriculum (here on the value: http://spurninglearning.blogspot.com/2012/01/electives-arent-elective-for-artists.html; and here on two really cool vocational integration models: http://spurninglearning.blogspot.com/2012/02/hands-on-classroom.html). I hope this gets a national conversation going about what it means to be educated in America that is beyond test scores and promoting knowledge without skills.

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